CHAPTER 4: MATHEMATICAL MODELING WITH MATLAB

 

Lecture 4.4: Root finding algorithms for nonlinear equations

 

Problem: Given a nonlinear equation:

f(x) = 0

Find all zeros (roots) x = x* of the function f(x).

 

Example: Consider a tunnel diode that has the following voltage (V) - current (I) characteristics:

I = I(V) = V3 - 1.5 V2 + 0.6 V

The tunnel diode is connected with a resistor (R) and a voltage source (E). Applying the Kirchhoff's voltage law, one can find that the steady current through the diode must satisfy the equation:

I(V) = ( E - V ) / R


For given values of E and R, this equation is of the form f(x) = 0, where the voltage x = V is to be found. Graphing I = I(V) and I = (E-V)/R at the same graph, one can show that either three or one solutions are possible. Actual computations of the roots (zeros) are based on the root finding algorithms.

% simple example of root finding algorithms for polynomial functions

R = 19.2; E = 1.4; c = [ 1,-1.5,0.6+1/R,-E/R];

% coefficients of the polynomial function f(x) = 0

p = roots(c)' % three steady currents throguh the tunnel diode

E = 1.8; c = [ 1,-1.5,0.6+1/R,-E/R]; p = roots(c)' % one (real) steady current

 

p = 0.7955 0.5323 0.1722

p = 0.8801 0.3099 - 0.1023i 0.3099 + 0.1023i

 

Methods of solution:

         Bracketing (bisection) methods

         Iterative (contraction mapping, Newton-Raphson, and secant) methods

         MATLAB root finding algorithms

Iterative (contraction mapping) method:

 

Construct the following mapping from xk to xk+1:

xk+1 = g(xk) = xk + f(xk)

Starting with an initial approximation x0, use the mapping above to find x1, x2, etc. If the sequence {xk} converges to a fixed point x = x* such that x* = g(x*) = x* + f(x*), then the value x* is the root (zero) of the nonlinear equation f(x) = 0.

 

% Graphical solution of the nonlinear equation: x*sin(1/x) = 0.2*exp(-x)

x = 0.0001 : 0.0001 : 2; f1 = x.*sin(1./x); f2 = 0.2*exp(-x); plot(x,f1,'b',x,f2,'g');

 

 

% Contraction mapping method for finding the root of the nonlinear equation:

% f(x) = x*sin(1/x)-0.2*exp(-x)

x = 0.364; % starting approximation for the root

eps = 1; tol = 0.0001; total = 8; k = 0;

while ((eps > tol) & (k < total)) % two termination criteria

xx = x + x*sin(1/x)-0.2*exp(-x); % a new approximation for the root

eps = abs(xx-x); x = xx; k = k+1;

fprintf('k = %2.0f, x = %6.4f\n',k,x);

end

stability = abs(1 + sin(1/x)-cos(1/x)/x+0.2*exp(-x));

if (stability >= 1)

fprintf('The contraction mapping method is UNSTABLE');

else

fprintf('The contraction mapping method is STABLE\n');

fprintf('The numerical approximation for the root: x = %6.4f',x);

end

k = 1, x = 0.3649

k = 2, x = 0.3684

k = 3, x = 0.3827

k = 4, x = 0.4391

k = 5, x = 0.6442

k = 6, x = 1.1832

k = 7, x = 2.0070

k = 8, x = 2.9393

The contraction mapping method is UNSTABLE

The main issue of the iterative method is to ensure that the sequence {xk} really converges to a fixed point x*. If not, the method diverges and the root (zero) x = x* cannot be obtained by the mapping method even if it exists. If the method diverges no matter how close the initial approximation x0 to the fixed point x*, the method is unstable. If the method converges for small errors (distances) |x0 x*|, the method is stable and contracting, even if it could diverge for larger errors |x0 x*|.

 

The contraction mapping method is stable under the condition that

|g'(x*)| = |1 + f'(x*)| < 1

When the method is stable, the absolute error ek = | xk x* | reduces with the number of iterations k as

ek+1 = c ek, where |c| < 1. This is a linear contraction of the absolute error. According to the linear behavior, we classify the contraction mapping method as a linearly convergent (first-order) algorithm.

 

R = 19.2; E = 1.4;

x = 0.4; % starting approximation for the root

eps = 1; tol = 0.000001; total = 10000; k = 0;

while ((eps > tol) & (k < total)) % two termination criteria

xx = x + x^3-1.5*x^2+0.6*x-E/R+x/R; % a new approximation for the root

eps = abs(xx-x); x = xx; k = k+1; e(k) = x-0.880133;

end

stability = abs(1 + 3*x^2-3*x+0.6+1/R);

if (stability >= 1)

fprintf('The contraction mapping method is UNSTABLE');

else

fprintf('The contraction mapping method is STABLE\n');

fprintf('The numerical approximation for the root: x = %8.6f',x);

end

ee = e(2:k)./e(1:k-1); plot(ee);

 

The contraction mapping method is STABLE

The numerical approximation for the root: x = 0.532249

 

Iterative (Newton-Raphson) method:

 

Construct the following mapping from xk to xk+1:

 

xk+1 = g(xk) = xk

 

Starting with an initial approximation x0, use the mapping above to find x1, x2, etc. If the sequence {xk} converges to a fixed point x = x* such that x* = g(x*), then the value x* is the root (zero) of the nonlinear equation f(x) = 0. The Newton-Raphson method is based on the slope approximation of the function y = f(x) by the straight line which is tangent to the curve y = f(x) at the point x = xk:

 

y = f(xk) + f'(xk) (x-xk)

 

The estimate of the root x = xk+1 is obtained by setting: y = 0.

 

The Newton-Raphson method is always stable. It converges when x0 is sufficiently close to x* but it may diverge when x0 is far from x*. If f'(x*) 0, the absolute error ek reduces with iterations at the quadratic rate as ek+1 = c ek2. Therefore, the Newton-Rapson method is of fast convergence. When the root is multiple and f'(x*) =0, the rate of convergence becomes linear again, like in the contraction mapping method.

 

% Newton-Raphson method for finding the root of the nonlinear equation:

% f(x) = x*sin(1/x)-0.2*exp(-x)

x = 0.55; % starting approximation for the root

eps = 1; tol = 10^(-14); total = 100; k = 0; format long;

while ((eps > tol) & (k < total)) % two termination criteria

f = x*sin(1/x)-0.2*exp(-x); % the function at x = x_k

f1 = sin(1/x)-cos(1/x)/x+0.2*exp(-x); % the derivative at x = x_k

xx = x-f/f1; % a new approximation for the root

eps = abs(xx-x); x = xx; k = k+1;

fprintf('k = %2.0f, x = %12.10f\n',k,x);

end

 

k = 1, x = 0.2769143433

k = 2, x = 0.3717802027

k = 3, x = 0.3636237820

k = 4, x = 0.3637156975

k = 5, x = 0.3637157087

k = 6, x = 0.3637157087

 

% Example of several roots of the nonlinear equations:

% Newton-Raphson method converges to one of the roots,

% depending on the initial approximation

% f(x) = cos(x)*cosh(x) + 1 = 0 (eigenvalues of a uniform beam)

 

eps = 1; tol = 10^(-14); total = 100; k = 0; x = 18;

while ((eps > tol) & (k < total))

f = cos(x)*cosh(x)+1; f1 = sinh(x)*cos(x)-cosh(x)*sin(x);

xx = x-f/f1; eps = abs(xx-x); x = xx; k = k+1;

end

fprintf('k = %2.0f, x = %12.10f\n',k,x);

 

k = 7, x = 17.2787595321

eps = 1; k = 0; x = 9;

while ((eps > tol) & (k < total))

f = cos(x)*cosh(x)+1; f1 = sinh(x)*cos(x)-cosh(x)*sin(x);

xx = x-f/f1; eps = abs(xx-x); x = xx; k = k+1;

end

fprintf('k = %2.0f, x = %12.10f\n',k,x);

 

k = 7, x = 7.8547574382

 

eps = 1; k = 0; x = 5;

while ((eps > tol) & (k < total))

f = cos(x)*cosh(x)+1; f1 = sinh(x)*cos(x)-cosh(x)*sin(x);

xx = x-f/f1; eps = abs(xx-x); x = xx; k = k+1;

end

fprintf('k = %2.0f, x = %12.10f\n',k,x);

 

k = 6, x = 4.6940911330

 

eps = 1; k = 0; x = 2;

while ((eps > tol) & (k < total))

f = cos(x)*cosh(x)+1; f1 = sinh(x)*cos(x)-cosh(x)*sin(x);

xx = x-f/f1; eps = abs(xx-x); x = xx; k = k+1;

end

fprintf('k = %2.0f, x = %12.10f\n',k,x);

 

k = 5, x = 1.8751040687

 

Iterative (secant) method:

 

The slope of the curve y = f(x) at the point x = xk can be approximated in the case if the exact derivative f'(xk) is difficult to compute. The backward difference formula approximates the derivative by the slope of the secant line between two points [xk,f(xk)] and [xk-1,f(xk-1)]:

 

f'(xk)

 

With the backward approximation, the Newton-Raphson method becomes the secant method:

 

xk+1 = g(xk) = xk

 

Starting with two initial approximations x0,x1, use the mapping above to find x2, x3, etc. If the sequence {xk} converges to a fixed point x = x* such that x* = g(x*), then the value x* is the root (zero) of the nonlinear equation f(x) = 0.

 

In order to start the secant method, two starting points x0 and x1 are needed. They are usually chosen arbitrary but close to each other. Like the Newton-Raphson method, the secant method is also unconditionally convergent and it converges faster than the linear contraction mapping method. However, the rate of convergence is slower than that of the Newton-Raphson method. The rate is in fact exotic: neither linear nor quadratic. The absolute error ek reduces with iterations at the superlinear rate as ek+1 = c ek1.6918.

 

 

% Secant method for finding the root of the nonlinear equation:

% f(x) = x*sin(1/x)-0.2*exp(-x)

eps = 1; tol = 10^(-14); total = 100; k = 1; format long;

x = 0.55; f = x*sin(1/x)-0.2*exp(-x); % starting approximation for the root

x0 = x; f0 = f; x = x + 0.01;

while ((eps > tol) & (k < total)) % two termination criteria

f = x*sin(1/x)-0.2*exp(-x); % the function at x = x_k

xx = x-f*(x-x0)/(f-f0); % a new approximation for the root

eps = abs(xx-x); x0 = x; f0 = f; x = xx; k = k+1;

fprintf('k = %2.0f, x = %12.10f\n',k,x);

end

k = 2, x = 0.2715890602

k = 3, x = 0.3878094689

k = 4, x = 0.3650168333

k = 5, x = 0.3636699429

k = 6, x = 0.3637157877

k = 7, x = 0.3637157087

k = 8, x = 0.3637157087

k = 9, x = 0.3637157087

 

MATLAB root finding algorithms:

 

         fzero: searches for a zero of a nonlinear function starting with an initial approximation

         fminbnd: searches for a minimum of a nonlinear function in a finite interval

         fminsearch: searches for a minimum of a nonlinear function with an initial approximation (using the Nelder-Mead simplex method of direct search)

 

% MATLAB algorithn for finding the root of the nonlinear equation:

% f(x) = x*sin(1/x)-0.2*exp(-x)

x0 = 0.55; f = 'x*sin(1/x)-0.2*exp(-x)';

x = fzero(f,x0);

fprintf('The root is found at x = %12.10f\n',x);

 

The root is found at x = 0.3637157087

 

% Search of zero of f(x) is the same as the search of minimum for [f(x)]^2

x = fminbnd('(x*sin(1/x)-0.2*exp(-x))^2',0.2,0.5)

x = fminsearch('(x*sin(1/x)-0.2*exp(-x))^2',0.3)

opt = optimset('TolX',10^(-10)); % termination tolerance on the value of x

x = fminbnd('(x*sin(1/x)-0.2*exp(-x))^2',0.2,0.5,opt)

 

x = 0.36371013129529

x = 0.36369140625000

x = 0.36371570742172

 

% The search fails when no roots are found

% The function y = 1 + x^2 has no zeros

x = fzero('1 + x^2',1)

 

Exiting fzero: aborting search for an interval containing a sign change

because NaN or Inf function value encountered during search

(Function value at -1.716199e+154 is Inf)

Check function or try again with a different starting value.

x = NaN